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Schengen visa calculator

Schengen Calculator

Schengen Visa Calculator

PASSPORT ENTRY REQUIREMENTS UK TO SPAIN

The rules for travelling or working in Europe will change from 1 January 2021: information updated 10th November*

*You will be able to travel to countries in the Schengen area for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa as a tourist, to visit family or friends, to attend business meetings, cultural or sports events, or for short-term studies or training.

If you are travelling to Spain and other Schengen countries without a visa, make sure your whole visit is within the limit. Visits to Schengen countries within the previous 180 days before you travel would count towards the 90-day limit

You stay for longer, to work or study, for business travel or for other reasons, you will need to meet the entry requirements set out by Spain. This could mean applying for a visa and/or work permit. You should check with the Spanish Embassy what type of visa and/or work permit, if any, you will need.

If you are in Spain with a visa or permit, your stay will not count towards the 90-day limit

The 90-day limit for visa-free travel will begin on 1 January 2021. Any days you stay in Spain or other Schengen countries before 1 January 2021 will not count towards the 90-day limit.*

Find all official guidance about moving or living in Spain HERE

Schengen Visa Calculator

We have been asked to explain further the rules regarding the time allowed within the Schengen Zone and what is permitted.
Two points you should be aware of.
One: The Schengen Zone covers most of Europe, not just Spain.
Two: It is not quite as restrictive as it may sound. Most people will not notice any difference. This really only effects those who remain for long periods of time in Europe. Not the occasional holiday maker.

It is not easy to explain or to understand but use the Schengen Visa Calculator above that will do these calculations for you.

Schengen Visa Calculator

Now the explanation for the more Mathematical who really want to understand it

The day you arrive and the day you leave is counted as a full day. So for example if you arrive on January 1st you would have to leave at the latest on 30th March. If you remain throughout the entire time, you would not be permitted to return to the zone until 180 days had passed since you arrived on 1st January. That is 28th June.
Now lets imagine you wanted to come one month here two months away. If you arrive on 1st January and leave 31st January. You have used. 31 days. You have 59 remaining. You now arrive on 1st April and leave 30th April. That is another 30 days so you have used 61 in total. You have 29 days remaining. If you now return 1st July you would expect to have to leave by 28th July as this is the full 90 days and you would now have used your full allowance. This however is NOT the case.

When you arrived on the 1stJanuary the 180 day clock started ticking. However it reached its 180 day limit on the 28th June. Therefore when you arrived on 1st July, they would be calculating from 3rd January, not the 1st. Like wise on the 2nd of July, they would be calculating from 4th January. So each day spent in the zone is one day added but one reduced. You would not be accumulating additional time. You would not start to add days until 180 days after you left on 31st January. That is 29th July. So you could stay until the 31st July and only have used 2 more days to your previous total of 29 remaining and still have 27 days left.

Now if you arrive 1st September. For each day stayed you would be dropping off days in March and not accumulating additional days yet. So the pattern of one month here and two months away could be followed without issue.
Like wise if we apply the same strategy for one month here one month away. We find problems. January 31 days. March 31 days May 31 days This would not be allowed as your 180 day period is not up until 28th June. So in May you would be limited to 28 days.

When you arrive in July the early days in January are no longer counted. So throughout the 31 days in July you would be adding one day and dropping off one day. So you could stay another 31 days in July. Again 30 days in September would be allowed but could be restricted to just 29 days on November.

I hope this explains it for the mathematicians and hopefully for everyone else it sets a few minds at rest that you usual two weeks at time four times per year is not likely to be an issue

Consequences of overstaying in Schengen Zone

Use the Schengen Visa Calculator above to make sure you do not overstay.

If you are being tempted to do such thing, you should just know the following things:

First thing that you should know, is that an overstayed visa never goes unnoticed. The immigration authorities have registered in their databases every person that enters and leaves the Schengen, and every overstaying, even just for a day, is recorded.

Secondly, intentional or unintentional, no overstaying is left unpunished. It could be a fine, immediate deportation or even getting banned from entering the Schengen Zone for a specific amount of time.

Despite that there is not a common policy for all Schengen Member States on the overstaying penalties, each of the states applies different types of penalties.  In general, all of the member states apply one of the following types of penalties for overstaying a Schengen visa or a permitted stay.

Deportation

When you get caught staying illegally in Europe, you will totally be deported to you home country. The deportation procedures depend on your case and the country where you are caught. You may be deported immediately, within just a few hours or after a few days. On the other hand, if you get caught engaging in paid activity while overstaying your visa, or engaging in illegal activities, you will most possibly be taken into custody where you will wait for your trial. If you are found guilty then you will be held in prison or fined with a high amount of money. Upon completing the punishment, you will then be deported to you home country and banned from entering the Schengen for a specific amount of time.

Deportation is always followed by another consequence. Usually you will know about it before being deported, since you will receive the decision on you case. If you have just overstayed a few days, and you are lucky to be caught in one of the countries that go easy on overstayers, you may leave without another penalty.

Difficulties coming back to Schengen

Even if you get back to your home country without any fine or ban, you should know that your overstaying will cause you problems the next time you attempt to enter the Schengen Zone. Immigration officers and border guards tend to be suspicious on people who overstay once, no matter in which country they were caught overstaying.  Therefore, you will encounter difficulties on getting a Schengen visa or crossing the EU external borders.

Fine

This is the most often penalty for overstaying a visa. Depending on the member state, the fees are applied differently. However, if you are caught after you have illegally remained in the Schengen for a longer time, aside of a fine being applied to you, you will also be banned from entering the Schengen Area for an appointed period of time, or even forever.

Ban

Banning people from entering the Schengen is usually applied to those overstaying and working or engaging in other illegal activities. A person can be banned for a period of three years and more from entering any of the member states of the Schengen area.

No consequences

There are also cases when people do not bear any consequence for overstaying their visa. If you are a child, or a person that cannot travel without a caretaker because of an illness or disability, then most possibly you will not face any consequences for overstaying.

On the other hand, if you face an accident or unforeseen illness, or you are in a situation that does not permit you to travel to your home country, then you are strongly advised to apply for a Schengen visa extension instead of overstaying.

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Comments (29)

Rated 0 out of 5 based on 0 voters
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

we have several flights booked
29/07/21-23/10/21 87 days
Back U.K. 90 days
24/01/22-25/03/22 61days
Back u.k 74 days
Our next trip is 7/06/22
Is this too soon to return as we haven’t been back in U.K. for 90 days

Craig Whiting
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It is ok to return on 7th June, but you will be restricted to just 29 Days

Derek
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If you put all your dates in the calculator above it will tell you if these are acceptable or not.

Tracy Ann
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2021 Spain – October / November / December

2022 UK – January / February / March
2022 Spain – April / May / June
2022 UK – July / August / September
2022 Spain – October / November / December

You will have spent 2 x 90 day periods in Spain in...

2021 Spain – October / November / December

2022 UK – January / February / March
2022 Spain – April / May / June
2022 UK – July / August / September
2022 Spain – October / November / December

You will have spent 2 x 90 day periods in Spain in 2022 and you must then stay out of Spain for 180 days before entering again.

2023 UK – January / February / March / April / May / June
2023 Spain – July / August / September
2023 UK – October / November / December

2024 Spain – January / February / March
2024 UK – April / May / June
2024 Spain – July August / September
2024 UK – October / November / December / January / February / March

You will have spent 2 x 90 day periods in Spain in 2024 and you must then stay out of Spain for 180 days before entering again.

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Floopyzebra
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I am reluctant to claim the accuracy of the calculator 100% as I did not write the program. and the programmer himself has added a disclaimer. However, it does match our understanding of the rule. The rule is not in relation to calendar months....

I am reluctant to claim the accuracy of the calculator 100% as I did not write the program. and the programmer himself has added a disclaimer. However, it does match our understanding of the rule. The rule is not in relation to calendar months. It is counted in days. It states you must not spend more than 90 days in the Schengen region within any 180 day period. You are overlooking, that if someone has spent 90 days in Spain. They have a further 90 days period of when they are not permitted to return. That completes the 180 days cycle. Thereafter, for each day they remain outside of the zone. They are reducing the number of days spent inside the zone. The 180 day cycle starts from the date of arrival, not the date they left. In theory it is therefore possible to spend 90 days in Spain and 90 days outside the zone and repeat that cycle. They would never be spending more than 90 days within any 180 day period.

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Derek
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Nowhere in the rules does it state that you are restricted to 180 days in the calendar year. It is possible there may be tax implications with that, but that is a question for a Financial adviser. It does not have any effect on the Schengen rules

Derek
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Your Schengen Calendar is misleading. A person can only stay in any Schengen Country for 90 days and then they must leave for 180 days before they can return. People are not able to go for the same 90 months every year. The scenario in my next...

Your Schengen Calendar is misleading. A person can only stay in any Schengen Country for 90 days and then they must leave for 180 days before they can return. People are not able to go for the same 90 months every year. The scenario in my next message is how it actually works.

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Floopyzebra
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If we arrive 1april ( second half of 180 days ) can we stay until 30 sept of same year ? Or must there be a 90 day gap

Paul Prickett
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No. If you arrive on 1st April, you must leave by 29 June at the latest. That is the 90 limit. It would October before you could return for a full calendar month again

Derek
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If I have an Irish passport does the rules still apply

Paige Dali
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Further to my last comment. Ireland are no longer given the exemption to Schengan rules. The limits will now apply

Derek
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

No. Ireland are part of the European Union and therefore not restricted by Schengan Rules. However please be aware that Spanish Law still requires visitors staying more than 90 days to have Spanish residencia. That is Spanish law and applies to...

No. Ireland are part of the European Union and therefore not restricted by Schengan Rules. However please be aware that Spanish Law still requires visitors staying more than 90 days to have Spanish residencia. That is Spanish law and applies to all non Spanish, whether part of the Union or not.

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Derek
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Do I get any better number if days as I own a Spanish property and pay all my taxes etc but not a resident as I currently spent 5 months in Spain and 7 months in the uk so I’m a uk resident ?

Jayne w
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Posted by Jayne w:

but not a resident as I currently spent 5 months in Spain and 7 months in the uk so I’m a uk resident ?
<br /><br />Is is possible to hold residencia in Spain and still be a UK resident. Do not confuse tax laws (which dictate the...

Posted by Jayne w:

but not a resident as I currently spent 5 months in Spain and 7 months in the uk so I’m a uk resident ?
<br /><br />Is is possible to hold residencia in Spain and still be a UK resident. Do not confuse tax laws (which dictate the country in which you are resident and the country in which you are domicile for the purposes of paying your taxes) with residencia laws of the European Union. Or with Spanish law which also requests you hold residencia to remain in SPain for 90 days wheter part of the Union or not. They are three different laws and you need to comply with all three to be legal. In short to stay in Spain for 5 months you need to have Spanish residencia. It will then be up to your accountant to help you to sort out where you should be paying your taxes.

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Derek
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No sorry there are no exceptions to the Schengen rules.

Tracy Ann
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Is the 90/180 equivalent to 180/360, can I have 2 blocks of 3month stays in any 1year

John Cochrane
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If you put all your dates in the calculator above it will tell you if they are within the required timeline.

Tracy Ann
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

If I travel on the 20 Nov 2020 does my 90 days not start to count until 01 Jan 2021?

John nota
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

As stated on the page above - The 90-day limit for visa-free travel will begin on 1 January 2021. Any days you stay in Spain or other Schengen countries before 1 January 2021 will not count towards the 90-day limit.

Tracy Ann
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

This has just been confirmed today - The 90-day limit for visa-free travel will begin on 1 January 2021. Any days you stay in Spain or other Schengen countries before 1 January 2021 will not count towards the 90-day limit.

Tracy Ann
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To be honest the issue is not 100% clear, but that would also be our understanding of it. They will count from 1st January

Derek
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Hi Again,
Don't know whether you received my last note as it doesn't show in your comments yet. I was asking why the April date is coming into the equation??? Are 120 days mentioned every year, if so aren't we using 74 days in 2020 and 51 in...

Hi Again,
Don't know whether you received my last note as it doesn't show in your comments yet. I was asking why the April date is coming into the equation??? Are 120 days mentioned every year, if so aren't we using 74 days in 2020 and 51 in 2021? Or doesn't it work like that. Thanks

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Cattins
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If you want to email me your intended travel dates, I will calculate it for you dblevins@benidormseriously.com

Derek
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Again. what April date are you referring to?

Derek
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Sorry but I'm not sure why the April date comes into the equation. And what date does the 120 day rule begin and end. We were supposing that in 2020 we'd only be using 74 days, and in 2021 only using 51 days..... it's all very confusing !!!
But...

Sorry but I'm not sure why the April date comes into the equation. And what date does the 120 day rule begin and end. We were supposing that in 2020 we'd only be using 74 days, and in 2021 only using 51 days..... it's all very confusing !!!
But thanks for your help anyway, it's much appreaciated.

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Cattins
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Sorry I have no idea what you are referring to when you mention the "april date".

Derek
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